LOC METHOD

Understanding The LOC Method

If you have naturally curly hair, you should do everything possible to add moisture to your hair or retain whatever liquids it has left after a long day, especially if you belong to the 3A to 4C spectrum. Curly hair can be brittle and notoriously hard to maintain if it doesn’t get the proper moisture.

Stylists, beauticians, and barbers all over the world have devised many techniques to keep their customers’ hair nourished and shiny, and one of the most famous is the Liquid, Oil, Cream Method, otherwise known as the LOC Method.

What Is the LOC Method?

Understanding The LOC Method

The LOC Method is a tried and tested way to moisturize your hair. It’s not a recent development in the field of hair science, and stylists have been using it for the past few years because of its effectiveness and its relative simplicity.

Rochelle Alikay Graham-Campbell is credited as the founder of the LOC Method. She runs a popular YouTube channel and has gone on to launch her line of beauty products. She is currently the CEO of Alikay Naturals, an online shop that sells beauty products with a focus on curly hair.

As mentioned above, the LOC in the LOC Method is a mnemonic device. It stands for liquid, oil, and cream, and the method says you need to apply hair products to your curly locks in that order.

  • First, you need to run water through your hair and hydrate it with a water-based moisturizer. 
  • Second, you need to lock in the moisture by using a moisturizing oil. 
  • Third, you need to seal in all the water and nutrients down to the cuticle level by applying light or heavy cream.

There are some slight variations on how it’s done, depending on your hair type.

What Is the LOC Method for Natural Hair?

loc method

At its core, the LOC Method is about layering your moisturizers for a more pronounced effect on your hair. If you have the 4B or 4C hair type, you know just how essential moisture is for healthy hair and scalp. Here’s how you should apply the LOC Method if you have natural, untreated hair.

Start with your liquid

Water should always be the foundation of your wash day habit. It is the core ingredient of any moisturizing agent you apply to your hair, so it makes sense that the LOC Method starts with water as its base. Add moisture to your hair by wetting it with water, spraying it with a water-based moisturizing mix, or both.

Mists with vegetable glycerin and aloe vera are apt choices as they can moisturize your scalp as well. As your hair receives moisture, it will naturally relax, opening up your scalp and your hair’s roots for the next step.

Use a penetrating oil

When it comes to choosing an oil for your wash day groove, picking up the first product you see on the supermarket shelf isn’t going to cut it. Pick an oil that is capable of delivering much-needed nutrients to your scalp and hair cuticles while locking in the moisture from the previous step. Avocado oil, olive oil, and virgin coconut oil are great choices.

Use the right cream

Generally, there are no wrong choices when it comes to hair creams, but some creams might give you additional benefits depending on your hair type. If you have 4C hair, you should choose heavier creams because 4C hair is more moisture-hungry and more tightly coiled than 3A to 4B hair. However, creams can work differently for different people, and you should stick to a product that your hair and scalp love.

How Often To Do the LOC Method on Natural Hair

LOC METHOD

Type 4B to 4C hair is the most fragile among all hair types, so if you belong in that spectrum, the LOC Method is a must for every wash day. Even when it’s not a wash day, it’s a good idea to apply the LOC Method, as your curly hair needs more moisture than naturally straight hair.

To avoid products from building up on your hair and scalp, don’t extend your wash-free time for more than two weeks. Setting wash times for your hair can be trial-and-error, but once you’ve found your groove, it’ll be easy finding your LOC groove, too. Most people with naturally curly hair get by applying it once a week or every four to five days.

Before stocking up on LOC products for the long-term, you should first see if the LOC Method works for your hair. Try it a least three times before you make a decision.

How To Do the LOC Method on Relaxed Hair

How To Do the LOC Method on Relaxed Hair

There is a healthy debate in the haircare community on which method works best for relaxed hair: the LOC Method, or its slightly modified sibling, the LCO method. Both sides make valid points, and the LOC Method does work on relaxed hair. Some people with relaxed hair find, though, that the LCO variation works better. 

You start by applying a liquid, water-based conditioner to your hair. Next, layer it up with a cream-based moisturizer, and then finally use avocado, coconut, or almond oil to seal in the moisture.

How To Achieve the LOC Method Without Locking It

How To Achieve the LOC Method Without Locking It

In the summer months, there’s often more humidity in the air, so your hair might not need as much moisture. You can modify the LOC Method to get a lighter feel by replacing the cream with light oil. You can call this the LOG method, as this process means you apply a liquid leave-in conditioner, sunflower oil, and grapeseed oil.

Coconut, avocado, and almond oil can make your hair too oily in the summer, especially when combined with your scalp’s natural oils that come out when you’re under the sun. The LOG method is a lighter alternative.

What Does LOC Method Mean?

picture of loc method chart

The LOC Method means complete moisturization. Many people apply moisturizers to their hair and skin while expecting it to stay when they go out in the sun, through dry weather, and various forms of pollution throughout their workday.

Curly hair needs constant moisture and upkeep, and applying liquid, oil, and cream, is one of the most practical solutions to ever come out of the haircare space.

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